GET /api/3.0/browse/place/Chicago,%20Illinois/
HTTP 200 OK
Allow: OPTIONS, GET
Content-Type: application/json
Vary: Accept

{
    "total": 13,
    "limit": 25,
    "offset": 0,
    "prev_offset": null,
    "next_offset": null,
    "page_size": 25,
    "this_page": 1,
    "num_this_page": 13,
    "prev_api": "",
    "next_api": "",
    "objects": [
        {
            "id": "A Grain of Sand (album)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "0 0/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/A%20Grain%20of%20Sand%20(album)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/A%20Grain%20of%20Sand%20(album)/"
            },
            "title": "A Grain of Sand (album)",
            "description": "Originally produced and released in 1973 by Paredon Records,\n \n  A Grain of Sand: Music for the Struggle by Asians in America\n \n by folk trio\n \n  Chris Kando Iijima\n \n ,\n \n  Nobuko JoAnne Miyamoto\n \n , and William \"Charlie\" Chin is widely recognized to be the first album of Asian American music. The record is a combination of folk songs, political ballads and protest songs. The music was written, performed and recorded at the height of the Asian American, black, and anti-war movements in the early '70s by New York musicians and activists Iijima, Miyamoto, and Chin, who were then in their twenties and early thirties. The original album includes artwork by Arlan Huang/Artist Resource Basement Workshop on the album jacket and liner notes with a political statement by the musicians, lyrics, and a list of Asian American publications from the era. One of the songs, \"We Are the Children,\" is likely the first song in English to explicitly mention the wartime incarceration of Japanese Americans.",
            "url_title": "A Grain of Sand (album)",
            "title_sort": "grainofsanda",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "albums"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 9-12",
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "Contemporary Folk"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Evils of racism",
                "Immigrant experience",
                "Injustice"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Widely available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Albums",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-music"
        },
        {
            "id": "Famous Suicides of the Japanese Empire (book)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "1 1/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/Famous%20Suicides%20of%20the%20Japanese%20Empire%20(book)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/Famous%20Suicides%20of%20the%20Japanese%20Empire%20(book)/"
            },
            "title": "Famous Suicides of the Japanese Empire (book)",
            "description": "First novel by acclaimed poet and memoirist David Mura that explores the impact of wartime incarceration—and the silences about it—on a Japanese American family in Chicago after World War II.",
            "url_title": "Famous Suicides of the Japanese Empire (book)",
            "title_sort": "famoussuicidesofthejapaneseempirebook",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "books"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "Fiction"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Coming of age",
                "Dangers of ignorance",
                "Power of silence",
                "Power of the past"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Widely available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Books",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-book"
        },
        {
            "id": "Roar of Silence (short story)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "2 2/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/Roar%20of%20Silence%20(short%20story)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/Roar%20of%20Silence%20(short%20story)/"
            },
            "title": "Roar of Silence (short story)",
            "description": "While watching a young boy play in a puddle, an elderly Nisei recalls his\n \n  Issei\n \n father. Forced to start over again in his sixties\n \n  in Chicago\n \n after having lost his farm during the mass roundup and incarceration, he also found his role as family leader usurped by his eldest son, who had been a member of the\n \n  442nd Regimental Combat Team\n \n . Despite these setbacks, the narrator recalls the lessons his father had silently transmitted to him.",
            "url_title": "Roar of Silence (short story)",
            "title_sort": "roarofsilenceshortstory",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "short stories"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 9-12",
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Communication—verbal and nonverbal",
                "Power of silence",
                "Wisdom of experience"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Widely available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Short Stories",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-file-text"
        },
        {
            "id": "Tokyo Rose: Victim of Propaganda (film)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "3 3/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/Tokyo%20Rose:%20Victim%20of%20Propaganda%20(film)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/Tokyo%20Rose:%20Victim%20of%20Propaganda%20(film)/"
            },
            "title": "Tokyo Rose: Victim of Propaganda (film)",
            "description": "Television documentary for A&E network's \"Biography\" series that sympathetically tells the story of\n \n  Iva Toguri d'Aquino\n \n and the myth of \"Tokyo Rose.\"",
            "url_title": "Tokyo Rose: Victim of Propaganda (film)",
            "title_sort": "tokyorosevictimofpropagandafilm",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "films"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 9-12",
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "Documentary"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Injustice",
                "Patriotism – positive side or complications",
                "Facing darkness",
                "Individual versus society"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Films and Video",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-film"
        },
        {
            "id": "And There Are Stories, There Are Stories (short story)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "4 4/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/And%20There%20Are%20Stories,%20There%20Are%20Stories%20(short%20story)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/And%20There%20Are%20Stories,%20There%20Are%20Stories%20(short%20story)/"
            },
            "title": "And There Are Stories, There Are Stories (short story)",
            "description": "Prose poem memoir by Momoko Iko that traces her family's journey out of the concentration camps and her subsequent upbringing away from Japanese American communities on the West Coast. She begins with her birth in 1940 to\n \n  Issei\n \n parents, her fleeting recollections of her family's incarceration, and life after the war, first in Philadelphia, then\n \n  Chicago\n \n . Various stories centering on racism, racial identity, interracial relations, and the legacy of the camps in the 1950s and 1960s follow, tracing the narrator's journey to becoming a writer.",
            "url_title": "And There Are Stories, There Are Stories (short story)",
            "title_sort": "andtherearestoriestherearestoriesshortstory",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "short stories"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 9-12",
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "Memoir"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Coming of age",
                "Coming of age",
                "Power of the past",
                "Self – inner and outer"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Short Stories",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-file-text"
        },
        {
            "id": "Makapuu Bay (short story)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "5 5/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/Makapuu%20Bay%20(short%20story)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/Makapuu%20Bay%20(short%20story)/"
            },
            "title": "Makapuu Bay (short story)",
            "description": "Short story by\n \n  Wakako Yamauchi\n \n about a divorced middle-aged Japanese American writer who goes to a literary conference in Honolulu where she runs into an old boyfriend from the war years. In flashback, we learn that Sachiko—nicknamed \"Pinky\" while incarcerated in\n \n  Poston\n \n with her father—had met Mitch Ochiai at the camp swimming hole, where she asked him to teach her to swim. They become a couple and continue to see each other when she resettles in Chicago while he attends the\n \n  Military Intelligence Service Language School\n \n in Minnesota. But her father's illness—and eventual death—forces her to return to Poston, while Mitch heads off to war, and they lose touch. Sachiko ends up marrying Joe Noda, her block manager, and settling in Los Angeles. Though Sachiko is divorced and Mitch has never married, a rekindling of the romance in Hawai'i is not to be.",
            "url_title": "Makapuu Bay (short story)",
            "title_sort": "makapuubayshortstory",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "short stories"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 9-12",
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "Fiction"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Disillusionment and dreams",
                "Facing reality",
                "Lost love",
                "Names – power and significance",
                "Reunion"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Widely available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Short Stories",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-file-text"
        },
        {
            "id": "Shirley Temple, Hotcha-cha (short story)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "6 6/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/Shirley%20Temple,%20Hotcha-cha%20(short%20story)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/Shirley%20Temple,%20Hotcha-cha%20(short%20story)/"
            },
            "title": "Shirley Temple, Hotcha-cha (short story)",
            "description": "Short story by Wakako Yamauchi about a\n \n  Nisei\n \n strandee couple and their difficulties both in wartime Japan and in the\n \n  resettlement\n \n era U.S. Told in the first-person voice of Mie, the story begins in 1939 when Mie is seventeen. As was the case for a sizable minority of Nisei youth, she had been sent to Japan for her education, having arrived there three years prior. She attends a boarding school and spends holidays with the Kodamas, a wealthy childless couple who are family friends. On a holiday, she meets Jobo Endo, a fellow Nisei, who is in Japan attending college. Courtship ensues. Recognizing the difficulties they would face in Japan as the war heats up, Jobo suggests that Mie ask the Kodamas for money to return to the U.S. However, the Kodamas had hoped to marry off Mie to a grand nephew. Though they consent to Jobo and Mie getting married, they are stuck in Japan as it enters war with the U.S. Facing hunger and other hardships, Jobo and Mie survive the war. Meanwhile, their families in the U.S. are sent to concentration camps; Mie's father dies in camp. Both families \"resettle\" in the Midwest, and Mie's family sends them money that allows them to return. But the time away had damaged relationships, and short stints with both families fail to work out. Eventually they move to California, where Jobo finds sudden success as an agent in the booming real estate market. But that success leads to the couple drifting apart, and Jobo eventually leaves Mie for another woman. The title of the story comes from a Shirley Temple doll that her family sent her in Japan that comes to represent her lost American life.",
            "url_title": "Shirley Temple, Hotcha-cha (short story)",
            "title_sort": "shirleytemplehotchachashortstory",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "short stories"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 9-12",
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "Fiction"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Displacement",
                "Heartbreak of betrayal",
                "Isolation",
                "Wisdom of experience"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Short Stories",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-file-text"
        },
        {
            "id": "Take What You Can Carry (book)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "7 7/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/Take%20What%20You%20Can%20Carry%20(book)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/Take%20What%20You%20Can%20Carry%20(book)/"
            },
            "title": "Take What You Can Carry (book)",
            "description": "The lives of two older teen boys, Kyle and Ken, alternate stories in the graphic novel\n \n  Take What You Can Carry\n \n (2012) by Kevin C. Pyle. Although experienced a generation apart, the stories of these two teens merge into a complete story of healing and redemption.",
            "url_title": "Take What You Can Carry (book)",
            "title_sort": "takewhatyoucancarrybook",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "books"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 7-8",
                "Grades 9-12"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "Young Adult"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Coming of age",
                "Individual versus society",
                "Vulnerability of the strong",
                "Wisdom of experience"
            ],
            "rg_readinglevel": [
                "Grades 7-8",
                "Grades 9-12"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Widely available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Books",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-book"
        },
        {
            "id": "My Name Is Yoshiko (book)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "8 8/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/My%20Name%20Is%20Yoshiko%20(book)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/My%20Name%20Is%20Yoshiko%20(book)/"
            },
            "title": "My Name Is Yoshiko (book)",
            "description": "Memoir of an ordinary Nisei woman that includes her wartime incarceration in American concentration camps. Yoshiko Kawaguchi (born in 1921) was the eldest daughter in a farm family in Downey, California. After attending sewing school, World War II hits and the family ends up in the horse stalls of\n \n  Santa Anita\n \n , then in the\n \n  Rohwer\n \n , Arkansas, concentration camp. Resettling in Michigan, she eventually gets a job at a fancy restaurant. She meets and marries a Nisei from Kaua'i and settles in Chicago, where her sisters and parents also eventually settle. Her husband becomes a mail carrier, and they adopt a girl. Later, they move to back to Downey and retire in Kaua'i.",
            "url_title": "My Name Is Yoshiko (book)",
            "title_sort": "mynameisyoshikobook",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "books"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 7-8",
                "Grades 9-12",
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "Memoir"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Names – power and significance",
                "Optimism – power or folly",
                "Role of women",
                "Working class struggles"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Books",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-book"
        },
        {
            "id": "Bend with the Wind: The Life, Family, and Writings of Grace Eto Shibata (book)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "9 9/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/Bend%20with%20the%20Wind:%20The%20Life,%20Family,%20and%20Writings%20of%20Grace%20Eto%20Shibata%20(book)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/Bend%20with%20the%20Wind:%20The%20Life,%20Family,%20and%20Writings%20of%20Grace%20Eto%20Shibata%20(book)/"
            },
            "title": "Bend with the Wind: The Life, Family, and Writings of Grace Eto Shibata (book)",
            "description": "Memoir of a Nisei woman—though written in the third person—that covers a nearly one hundred year history of a prominent San Luis Obispo area farming family and that ends with the author's graduation from college at age seventy-four.",
            "url_title": "Bend with the Wind: The Life, Family, and Writings of Grace Eto Shibata (book)",
            "title_sort": "bendwiththewindthelifefamilyandwritingsofgraceetoshibatabook",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "books"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 9-12",
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "Memoir"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Circle of life",
                "Family – blessing or curse",
                "Female roles",
                "Power of tradition"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Books",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-book"
        },
        {
            "id": "My Mother's Music (short story)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "10 10/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/My%20Mother's%20Music%20(short%20story)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/My%20Mother's%20Music%20(short%20story)/"
            },
            "title": "My Mother's Music (short story)",
            "description": "Short story by Lydia Yuri Minatoya told from the perspective of a\n \n  Sansei\n \n woman recalling her\n \n  Kibei\n \n mother's various stories—and silences—about the family history. The narrator's mother recalls her\n \n  Issei\n \n mother's banishment from the family after she had an affair with a Filipino immigrant patron of the family-run pool hall and how she never saw her mother again. The mother also recalls her own arranged marriage while in\n \n  Heart Mountain\n \n , but can recall little—or is unwilling to talk about—details of her and her family's wartime incarceration.\n \n  My Mother's Music\n \n appeared in the fifth volume of the\n \n  Fusion\n \n series published by the Asian American Studies Department at San Francisco State University. Minatoya later published a memoir titled\n \n  Talking to High Monks in the Snow: An Asian-American Odyssey\n \n (1989)—which includes \"My Mother's Music\" as its first chapter—as well as a novel,\n \n  The Strangeness of Beauty\n \n (2001).",
            "url_title": "My Mother's Music (short story)",
            "title_sort": "mymothersmusicshortstory",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "short stories"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 9-12",
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "Fiction"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Power of the past",
                "Power of silence",
                "Role of women"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Limited availability"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Short Stories",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-file-text"
        },
        {
            "id": "Chicago Goes to War, 1941-1945 (exhibition)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "11 11/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/Chicago%20Goes%20to%20War,%201941-1945%20(exhibition)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/Chicago%20Goes%20to%20War,%201941-1945%20(exhibition)/"
            },
            "title": "Chicago Goes to War, 1941-1945 (exhibition)",
            "description": "1992–93 exhibition at the Chicago Historical Society on the impact of World War II on Chicago. Among the topics covered in the exhibition is the\n \n  resettlement in the Chicago\n \n area of Japanese Americans from wartime concentration camps. It was one of several major local exhibitions that appeared around the 50th anniversary of World War II and that included aspects of the local Japanese American story.",
            "url_title": "Chicago Goes to War, 1941-1945 (exhibition)",
            "title_sort": "chicagogoestowar19411945exhibition",
            "categories": [
                "Chroniclers"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "exhibitions"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 3-5",
                "Grades 6-8",
                "Grades 9-12",
                "Adult"
            ],
            "rg_genre": [
                "History"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Importance of community"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "No availability"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Museum Exhibitions",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-university"
        },
        {
            "id": "Nihonjin Face (play)",
            "model": "article",
            "index": "12 12/{'value': 13, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/Nihonjin%20Face%20(play)/",
                "json": "http://resourceguide.densho.org/api/3.0/articles/Nihonjin%20Face%20(play)/"
            },
            "title": "Nihonjin Face (play)",
            "description": "Short play for school audiences by Janet Hayakawa and Tere Martínez that juxtaposes the Japanese American incarceration with the Civil Rights Movement and anti-immigrant sentiment in the present.",
            "url_title": "Nihonjin Face (play)",
            "title_sort": "nihonjinfaceplay",
            "categories": [
                "Arts"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype": [
                "plays"
            ],
            "rg_interestlevel": [
                "Grades 3-5",
                "Grades 7-8"
            ],
            "rg_theme": [
                "Circle of life",
                "Evils of racism",
                "Progress – real or illusion",
                "Wisdom of experience"
            ],
            "rg_availability": [
                "Widely available"
            ],
            "rg_rgmediatype_label": "Plays",
            "rg_rgmediatype_icon": "fa-ticket"
        }
    ],
    "query": {
        "query": {
            "bool": {
                "filter": [
                    {
                        "term": {
                            "published_rg": true
                        }
                    },
                    {
                        "term": {
                            "rg_geography": "Chicago, Illinois"
                        }
                    }
                ]
            }
        }
    },
    "aggregations": {}
}